Elsewhen by Lillie Harris

I first came across “Elsewhen” by Lillie Harris when she wrote it for the St. Magnus Composers’ course in 2017 and I knew straight away that I wanted to programme it with Nordic Viola. It is so evocative of the ancient monuments, and in particular of the Stones of Stenness, with its sense of mystery and eeriness. There’s something quite unsettling about the music or, as Orkney Arts Society put it, “There is edge here – edges, edginess, margins and menace under the surface.”

I’ll leave you with Lillie now to explain a little bit more about the piece, working alongside Orla Stevens on the art and, in general, about her collaboration with Nordic Viola.

Ancient sites are intriguing: they offer us amazement at the sheer age of artefacts, many mysteries of why things were that way, and the sense of a delicate thread connecting us now, to those people then. Our interactions with these relics helps us build an image of our past, but there is only so much we can learn from what remains – the rest is lost to time.

​In ‘Elsewhen’ I have sought to capture the strangeness, wonder, and melancholy of objects and sites that exist out of time: they retain traces and memories of the past, but have outlived those for whom they were built, and have been left behind.

Written for the St Magnus Composers Course 2017

www.lillieharris.com

Sibelius’ En Saga – Dunblane Cathedral 28th November 3pm

The piece that inspired Nordic Viola’s “Sagas and Seascapes” is the piece that rounds off our series of three concerts that have taken us to Orkney, Shetland and now finally home to Dunblane.

This concert (tickets here) will be an event not to be missed, because whilst the material in the first version of Sibelius  En Saga dates back to his studies in Vienna during 1890-1891, this Septet version only received its first official performance in the Brahms Saal of the Musikverein, Vienna in June 2003.

So what’s the story behind the Saga? We know that melodies jotted down by Sibelius in Vienna ended up in the orchestral version of En Saga. We also know that in Spring 1891 he was working on an Octet and in September 1892 he mentioned a “Septet.” One month later he completed the first orchestral version of En Saga, which he stated was based on the Octet. The original Septet has not survived, but Gregory M. Barrett made a performing version based on the first orchestral version. I can’t say for sure, but I have a sneaking feeling that Sunday may just be its Scottish premiere.

What I love about this score is that it really brings out the folky element of this very Finnish-sounding melody, driven on by Sibelius’ wonderful ostinato rhythms. There’s so much colour and excitement in this score and it’s so much fun to play. Have a listen here in this revcording y the Turku Ensemble from Finland:

Speaking of premieres, our wonderful commission “Aud” by Linda Buckley, supported by the PRS Foundation’s Women Make Music programme, will receive its first mainland Scottish performance and Linda will be along to hear it. “Aud” traces the journey across the North Atlantic of the eponymous heroine, a 9th century settler of Iceland whilst simultaneously reflecting on how it felt to yearn to travel during lockdown.

Lillie Harris’ Elsewhen tells a more ancient tale yet, of the ancient monuments of Orkney and the stories they pass on to us across the ages. The music has a unsettling sense of eeriness reminiscent of standing near these stones and their all-knowing presence in the winter half-light.

Rounding out our programme are two arrangements of traditional tunes by the Danish String Quartet. Firstly the Unst Boat Song from Shetland,  which was set in the old Norn language and finally the Dromer, a Danish reel drawn from a Scottish melody.

And what of the story told by En Saga? Well, in the spirit of Nordic Noir, the underlying feeling is that all does not end well. Our violinist, Jacquie, has her own Saga, but she says it’s too horrid to share. Perhaps you can corner her in the cathedral and persuade her to tell all!

Dunblane Cathedral Arts Guild – Sagas & Seascapes

Sunday, 28 November 2021, 3.00pm – Sagas & Seascapes

Nordic Viola’s Sagas and Seascapes series culminates in Dunblane with our biggest ensemble yet as we perform Sibelius’ great tone poem, En Saga, in its original septet version.

Aud by Orla Stevens

Linda Buckley’s Aud, which was commissioned by Nordic Viola for Orkney International Science Festival, has been attracting a lot of attention since we first performed it online. It is currently a featured work in Creative Scotland’s #ClassicAll campaign and you can view a video performance of it here

Linda’s evocative score reimagines the journey of Aud the Deep-Minded from Norway and Ireland via Caithness, Orkney and Faroe to Iceland, where she was one of the early settlers in the 9th century. Linda wrote the piece during lockdown and, as well as telling the ancient story of Aud, the music is full of a sense of yearning to travel again to the Far North.

Elsewhen by Orla Stevens

Lillie Harris’ Elsewhen explores the mystery of the ancient standing stones of Orkney. You can hear Lillie talking about the piece onsite in Orkney here.

The programme is bookended by the Danish String Quartet’s delightful arrangements of the Unst Boat Song from Shetland and The Dromer, a Danish folk dance based on the Scottish reel “The Drummer.” Both these tunes are taken from the Danish String Quartet’s Last Leaf album.

The concert starts at 3pm. To avoid queues, please pre-register contact details for NHS Test and Protect on this link: https://www.dunblanecathedral.org.uk/event/10525272

Orla Stevens

I’m sure that a lot of you will be intrigued by the beautiful paintings above. They were specially commissioned by Nordic Viola for our Sagas and Seascapes series from Orla Stevens. Orla is currently resident in Callander, but grew up in Dunblane. She travelled with myself and the composers to Orkney to explore the landscapes and concepts behind the music.

Orla’s beautiful prints connected to the music will be available to order at the concert, alongside greetings cards with her beautiful images. If you can’t wait that long, you can also order them here.

Orla talks about her work on the project here: